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57th Regiment of Foot News
History

The regiment started out as the 59th Regiment of Foot raised in Gloucester in 1755. After the disbandment of the 50th Regiment of Foot and the 51st Regiment of Foot in 1756, it became the 57th Regiment of Foot. In 1782, it was given a county connection, becoming the "57th (the West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot".
The 57th Regiment earned their nickname of "the Die Hards" after their participation in the Battle of Albuera, one of the bloodiest battles of the Peninsular War, fought on the 16 May 1811. The commanding officer of the 57th, Colonel Inglis, was struck down by a charge of canister shot which hit him in the neck and left breast. He refused to be carried to the rear for treatment, but lay in front of his men calling on them to hold their position and when the fight reached its fiercest cried, "Die hard the 57th, die hard!". The casualties of the 57th were 422 out of the 570 men in the ranks and 20 out of the 30 officers. The Allied commander of the Anglo-Portuguese force Field Marshal Beresford wrote in his dispatch, "our dead, particularly the 57th Regiment, were lying as they fought in the ranks, every wound in front".".
The 57th arrived in New South Wales during 1826 serving at Van Diemens Land, Sydney, Victoria South Australia and the Swan River colony. The regiment was transferred to Madras in March, 1831. In 1881 it was united with the 77th (East Middlesex) Regiment of Foot to form The Middlesex Regiment.
Its regimental marches were 'Sir Manley Power' (quick) and 'Caledonian' (slow)
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By Sweden George Marillack in News on Wednesday 31 October @ 20:44
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